Travelling to Ireland during COVID-19

Introduction

If you are travelling to Ireland, you may have to quarantine on arrival. In some cases, you must pay in advance for mandatory hotel quarantine.

Everyone arriving in Ireland must complete a Passenger Locator Form before boarding a flight or taking a boat to Ireland.

People arriving from the EU and EEA who have an EU Digital COVID Certificate do not have to quarantine, unless their Certificate is based on an antigen test or they have not been vaccinated with an EMA-approved vaccine.

Different rules apply for arrivals from outside the EEA.

Passenger locator form

If you arrive into Ireland from another country, including if you are travelling onwards to Northern Ireland, you must fill in an online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before you arrive. One form should be completed for each passenger aged 18 or older. You will get an email receipt, which you will have to show when boarding. It is a pre-boarding requirement.

You must also fill out this form if you arrive in Ireland through Northern Ireland and were overseas in the 14 days before your arrival in Ireland.

The information on the form may be used to contact you to check your location, or to contact you if there is a confirmed or suspected case of COVID-19 on your flight or ferry.

You need the following details to complete the COVID-19 passenger locator form:

  • The mobile phone number that you will use when in Ireland
  • Your email address
  • Your place of residence when staying in Ireland
  • Information on how you arrived in Ireland (for example: name of airline or ferry, flight or ferry number)
  • Passport details of passengers

You are also asked which of the following you are travelling with:

  • Proof of vaccination
  • Proof of recovery from COVID-19 in the past 6 months
  • Proof of negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours before arrival OR a positive RT-PCR COVID-19 test result at least 11 days before arrival (and no more than 180 days)

If any of the information you provide on the form changes over the next 14 days, you must email passengerlocatorform@plf.ie with your updated information.

You do not have to fill in this form in some limited situations.

Failure to complete this form is an offence.

What does fully vaccinated mean?

You are fully vaccinated when you get a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and it is:

If you got a vaccine other than those listed above, you are not considered ‘fully vaccinated’.

You are also not fully vaccinated if the interval between your first and second doses is less than the required period (for two dose vaccines).

What is valid proof of vaccination?

You should bring proof that you have been fully vaccinated when you travel to Ireland.

If you were vaccinated in the EEA you should get an EU Digital COVID Certificate (DCC).

If you were vaccinated in a country outside the EEA (that is, a third country) you should have a valid COVID-19 vaccination certificate that has been officially recognised as equivalent to the EU DCC.

Other proof that you have been vaccinated can also be accepted. The proof can be in written or electronic format in Irish or English. Where it is in another language, an official translation into Irish or English is needed.

Your proof of vaccination must contain the following:

  • Confirmation that you are fully vaccinated
  • The date or dates you were vaccinated
  • The name of body in the state implementing the vaccination programme that administered the vaccine to you

What does ‘recovered from COVID-19’ mean?

You are ‘recovered from COVID-19’ if you had COVID-19 in the past 180 days. You should bring proof that you have recovered from COVID-19 when you travel to Ireland.

If you were tested for COVID-19 in the EEA, you should get an EU Digital COVID Certificate (DCC). Other proof that you have recovered from COVID-19 can also be accepted.

What other proof of recovery is acceptable?

If you do not have a DCC, your proof must be in written or electronic format in English or Irish. If it is in a language other than English or Irish, it needs to be accompanied by a certified translation.

Your proof of recovery must contain the following:

  • Your full name and date of birth
  • The date of your first relevant positive test result
  • The disease or variant from which you have recovered
  • The country where the test was carried out
  • Details of the body that issued the certificate
  • Dates the certificate is valid from and expires (you must have tested positive at least 11 days ago but no longer than 180 days ago)

If I arrive into Ireland from the EU or EEA

This information includes arrivals from the EEA (the EU plus Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein), Andorra, Monaco, the Holy See, San Marino and Switzerland.

If you arrive into Ireland with an EU Digital COVID Certificate, you do not need to do any further testing or quarantine.

Some exceptions apply:

  • If your DCC is based on an antigen test, you must have a RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours before your arrival
  • If you have been in a non-EEA country in the 14 days before arriving in Ireland, you must follow the rules set out in ‘If I arrive into Ireland from outside the EU or EEA’ below.
  • If your DCC is based on a vaccine that is not approved by the EMA, you must have a RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours before your arrival and self-quarantine for 14 days. If you are arriving from a designated country, you must pre-book accommodation in a quarantine hotel, (see ‘What does fully vaccinated mean?’ above).

If you do not have a DCC, you need one of the following to avoid quarantine:

  • Proof that you are fully vaccinated (see ‘What does fully vaccinated mean?’ above)
  • Proof that you have recovered from COVID-19 (see ‘What does ‘recovered from COVID-19’ mean’ above)
  • Proof of a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours before your arrival

Testing requirements

If you have a DCC, you do not need a negative RT-PCR test unless your DCC is based on:

  • A negative antigen test, or
  • Any other non-RT-PCR test, or
  • A vaccine not approved by the EMA

If any of the above apply, you must have proof of a negative RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.

If you arrive without a DCC or other valid proof of vaccination or recovery, you need proof of a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours before your arrival.

If you arrive from the EU or EEA with no DCC, no proof of recovery from COVID-19 and no proof of a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours before your arrival, you will have to enter mandatory hotel quarantine. You can leave hotel quarantine if you get a ‘Day 1’ negative RT-PCR test, usually within 2 to 3 days.

Summary for people arriving from the EU

DCC or other proof of vaccination/recovery Test and quarantine requirements
A Digital COVID Certificate or other proof of vaccination* or recovery

*You must have got an EMA-approved vaccine

No RT- PCR test on arrival is needed (however, if your DCC is based on a non RT-PCR test (antigen) you will need to get a RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours before your arrival).

No quarantine

No Digital COVID Certificate or other proof of vaccination or recovery RT-PCR test is needed (taken within 72 hours before your arrival)

Negative test: no quarantine

No RT-PCR test on arrival: mandatory hotel quarantine

Note that you can leave mandatory hotel quarantine if you get a negative RT-PCR test taken on Day 1 of your quarantine

If I arrive into Ireland from the UK

All travellers to Ireland will need to fill out a Passenger Locator Form. Failure to complete this form is an offence.

No travel-related testing or quarantine is necessary for travellers from Great Britain with valid proof of full vaccination.

If you have valid proof of recovery from COVID in the past 180 days, no travel-related testing or quarantine will be necessary.

If you do not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery and are travelling from Great Britain you will need to:

  • Show evidence of a negative RT-PCR test result taken taken within 72 hours before your arrival
  • Self-quarantine (also called home quarantine)
  • Take a post-arrival test (from day 5 onwards)

You can finish your home quarantine if you get a negative or not detected RT-PCR test result taken from day 5 onwards after you arrive in Ireland.

Travellers should note that guidance can change at short notice and check advice before they travel.

There are no restrictions on travel to or from Northern Ireland.

However, if you arrive into Ireland through Northern Ireland and you have been overseas in the 14 days before you arrive, you must comply with the relevant restrictions that apply to the country you arrived from.

If I arrive into Ireland from outside the EU or EEA

If you arrive in Ireland from outside the EU, EEA or the UK, the testing and quarantine rules depend on whether you have been in a designated country in the 14 days before you arrive in Ireland.

Arriving from a non-designated country

If you arrive into Ireland from a non-designated country outside the EU or EEA and you have valid proof of vaccination or proof that you have recovered from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, you do not need to do any travel-related testing or quarantine.

You should read the definitions of ‘fully vaccinated’ and ‘recovered from COVID-19’ above.

If you do not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery, you will need to:

  • Show evidence of a negative RT- PCR test result taken within 72 hours before your arrival
  • Self-quarantine (also called home quarantine)
  • Take a post-arrival test - this is provided through the HSE

If you arrive in Ireland from a non-designated country without valid proof of either vaccination, recovery or a negative RT-PCR test result taken within 72 hours before your arrival, you must enter mandatory hotel quarantine. You can leave hotel quarantine if you get a ‘Day 1’ negative RT-PCR test, usually within 2 to 3 days.

Arriving from a designated country

If you arrive from a designated country outside the EU or EEA, the rules will depend on if you have been vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19 in the past 180 days.

If you have proof of vaccination or recovery

You need to:

  • Show a negative result from a RT- PCR test taken within 72 hours before your arrival
  • Self-quarantine (also called home quarantine)
  • Take a post-arrival test - this is provided through the HSE

If you do not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery

You need to:

  • Produce evidence of a negative result from a RT- PCR test taken within 72 hours before your arrival
  • Complete a mandatory hotel quarantine
  • Take a post-arrival test

Summary for people arriving from outside the EU

I am I am arriving from a non-designated country outside the EU I am arriving from a designated country outside the EU
Vaccinated* or recovered from COVID-19 (in the past 180 days)

*Must be an EMA approved vaccine

No RT-PCR test needed

No quarantine

RT-PCR test needed (taken within 72 hours before your arrival)

Self -quarantine

Further test post arrival (Day 5 onwards)

Not vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19 (in the past 180 days) RT-PCR needed

Self- quarantine (home quarantine)

Further test post arrival (Day 5 onwards)

If you arrive with no RT-PCR test, hotel quarantine is mandatory until you get a negative test.

RT-PCR test needed (taken within 72 hours before your arrival)

Mandatory hotel quarantine

Further test post arrival (Day 5 onwards)

Exceptions to home quarantine

You do not have to complete mandatory home quarantine in some limited cases. For example, essential workers, may be able to leave their place of quarantine when necessary to do their essential job. This is only for as long as strictly required.

Travelling with children

All children under the age of 18 must be declared on a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form by an adult accompanying them.

Unaccompanied children aged 12 and over must complete their own COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

If you are travelling with a child that is between the ages of 12 and 17, they must have a negative RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery.

If only the adults accompanying the child are fully vaccinated, the child is required to have a negative RT-PCR test.

Children aged 11 and under do not need a RT-PCR test to travel to Ireland.

Children of any age, travelling with accompanying vaccinated or recovered adults do not need to self-quarantine post arrival. However, if one accompanying adult needs to self-quarantine, then all children must also self-quarantine.

Unaccompanied children who are required to complete hotel quarantine can quarantine at home or their place of residence if an adult can ensure they will follow quarantine requirements.

Page edited: 20 August 2021