Your child's first Irish passport

Introduction

This document explains how to apply for your child’s first Irish passport.

Your child must be an Irish citizen to apply for an Irish passport. If you are not sure whether your child qualifies as an Irish citizen, you can read our documents on citizenship.

A child must have their own passport, and cannot be included on their parent’s passport. A child’s passport is valid for 5 years.

In most cases, the Passport Service must get consent from all the child’s guardians before it can issue a child’s passport.

You can apply for your child’s first Irish passport:

  • Online, through Passport Online
  • By post, through Passport Express
  • In person, through the Passport Office’s counter service, or at an embassy or consulate abroad

Passport applications and COVID-19

The Passport Service has resumed the processing of online applications for all passport types. You should expect delays to your application.

The processing of Passport Express applications has also recommenced in Ireland and Northern Ireland. The turnaround time for processing paper based applications is 6-8 weeks.

Passport phone lines are now open.

If you urgently need a passport to travel (because of the death or serious illness of a family member, or you need urgent medical treatment abroad), you should contact the Passport Service through webchat.

Passport Online service

From 1 November 2019, if you are living in Ireland, Northern Ireland, Great Britain, the EU, the EEA or Switzerland you can use the Passport Online service to apply for your child’s first Irish passport.

You need access to a printer for your first passport application. You must also be able to pay by credit or debit card. You need to send original documents to the Passport Service after you finish your online application.

Digital photographs

You must include a digital photo as part of your application. You can do this in 3 ways:

  • Have your child’s photo taken at a participating photo provider, who will give you a unique code to include with your online application.
  • Have your child’s photo taken at a photo provider, and ask them to email it to you, or save the photo on a USB device, or other storage method. You must have access to the photo when completing your online application
  • Take a photo at home using a digital camera or smartphone. The photo must capture your child’s image from the waist upwards .

You can read more about the photo requirements for the Passport Online service.

Proving your child’s identity

  • When your online application is completed, you will be asked to print a Child Passport Identity and Consent Form
  • If you are applying in Ireland, this form must be signed by an "appropriate witness"
  • If you are applying outside Ireland, the form can be witnessed by a person in one of the occupations listed on the Passport Online site, or on the verification form itself.
  • The Passport Service must get consent from all the child’s guardians before it can issue a child’s passport. See "Guardian Consent" below for how guardian's consent works.
  • Your child's other guardian (if there is one) can ask another appropriate witness to witness their consent separately, if they wish.
  • If your child is 7 years old or above, your child will sign the form in the presence of the witness (you can sign the form on your child’s behalf for younger children)

Sending documents

Once the application is completed, you will be asked to print an Application Cover Page. This will list the documents you have to send to the Passport Service. All documents sent must be original. The Passport Service recommends that you use a secure method of postage for sending your documents. A postage label is generated as part of your application (if you are applying in Ireland).

If you are applying outside Ireland, you should use a reliable postal service. In some countries, the local postal services are not reliable. In this case, you can submit your documents to your nearest Irish Embassy.

You can read more about the documents you may need to send below.

You can read Frequently Asked Questions about the extended Passport Online service.

Applying by post through Passport Express

Passport Express is a service provided by An Post.

If your child is an Irish citizen living in Ireland, you should fill in form APS 1. You will find this form at Garda stations and at any Post Office. It is not currently possible to download the paper application form.

Photographs

You must include 4 recent identical photographs of your child with your application. Two of these photographs should be signed on the back by the person who witnesses the application. The witness should also write the form number shown in Section 9 of the application form on the two signed photographs. If your child is 7 years old or above, your child must sign the form in the presence of the witness.

More detailed information on passport photographs is available.

Passport Express abroad

A number of UK Post Office branches in Northern Ireland provide the Passport Express service (pdf). There are also 2 post offices in Great Britain offering Passport Express (Glasgow Post Office, 140 West Nile Street, Glasgow, G1 2RD and Liverpool Post Office, 1 – 3 South John Street, Liverpool, L1 8BN).

If you are applying abroad, suitable categories of witness are listed on the application form. The witness should enter their daytime contact number on the application form as this may need to be verified by the Passport Service or the relevant embassy or consulate.

Applying in person

It is not recommended to apply directly to the Passport Office for your child’s first passport.

The counter service in the Passport Office is designed to accommodate people who need to renew their passports urgently, and don’t have enough time to apply in other ways. You can make your child’s first-time application using the counter service, but it cannot be processed urgently –it will take at least 20 working days (not including postage times). Applications made in person are more expensive than applying online or through Passport Express (see ‘Fees’ below)

If you are living in a country where Passport Express or Passport Online are not available, you can apply for an Irish passport in person or using ordinary or registered post to your nearest Irish embassy or consulate. You use form APS 2.

You cannot download the application form. You can get the application form from the Irish embassy or consulate in the country where you live (or the closest embassy or consulate).

Guardian consent

The Passport Service must get consent from all the child’s guardians (unless the child is married) before it can issue a child’s passport.

Joint guardians

If you are or were married to the other parent of your child, and the other parent is still alive, both parents or guardians must give guardian consent.

If you are a joint guardian of the child, both parents or guardians must give guardian consent.

If you are applying online, after you complete the online form you must print out the Child Passport Identity and Consent Form which the guardians must sign.

If you are applying or renewing by post or in person both guardians must sign the parental consent section (Section 7) of the passport application form.

If you are not in touch with your child's other parent/guardian, or if that parent/guardian refuses to give consent, you can apply to the District Court for a court order, which will allow the Passport Service to issue the passport without that consent.

Sole guardians

The situation is different if you are the sole guardian of a child. This can happen if you are a single mother and the father has not arranged to become a joint guardian. It also happens if the other parent/guardian is deceased. If you are the sole guardian you will have to provide an affidavit (AFF 1) stating that you are the sole guardian. This should be completed in the presence of a solicitor or Commissioner for Oaths.

If the other parent/guardian is deceased, you will also have to provide a death certificate. If a death certificate is not yet available as the coroner has to hold an inquest into the death, you should provide an Interim Certificate of the Fact of Death which is issued by the coroner.

Babies born in the UK: If the birth was jointly registered by both parents in Northern Ireland or Great Britain, the father may have joint guardianship even if the parents never married.

The Department of Foreign Affairs has more information on parental consent on its website. These tables summarises guardian consent rules and the different documents that you must provide with your application

Two guardians Documents needed
Parents are/were married to each other and are both living Parents must both give consent. No additional documentation needed
Parents are not married, but father lived with mother of child for at least 12 months before, and at least 3 months after the birth of the child (applies from 18 January 2016 only Parents must both give consent. No additional documentation needed
Joint guardianship through statutory declaration Statutory declaration required
Joint guardianship through an order of the courts Original court order must be sent with application
A deceased guardian appointed a guardian in their will (testamentary guardian) Death certificate, AFFI 1 Sole Guardianship affidavit and certified copy (or original) of the deceased’s will required
Joint guardianship through a court order or guardianship law in another country Child’s birth certificate should be enough in most cases
One guardian Documents needed

Other guardian is deceased

Death certificate, AFFI 1 Sole Guardianship affidavit needed.
Parenting alone AFFI 1 Sole Guardianship affidavit needed

Fees for your child's passport

For first time applications, the fees are:

Passport Online - €20, plus €5 postage fee

Passport Express - €30, plus An Post’s fee of €9.50.

Counter Service (in person at the Passport Office) - €45

What documents do I need?

You must submit the following with your completed application form when you are applying for a child’s passport for the first time:

  • Four passport photographs of the child, 2 of which have been signed by a witness as per instructions provided with the application form (or a digital photo if applying online)
  • Child's birth certificate
  • Appropriate fee
  • PPS number (if the child is resident in Ireland)
  • Additional documentation to confirm the child’s Irish citizenship. The documents you need to provide depend on how the child became an Irish citizen – see below.

Additional documentation

The additional documentation you need to send depends on how your child obtained their Irish citizenship.

My child was born in Ireland before 1 January 2006

Your child is an Irish citizen by birth. You only need to show that the child was born in Ireland to prove citizenship. You should send your child's birth certificate.

I am an EU/EEA/Swiss citizen, and my child was born in Ireland after 1 January 2006.

You will have to show that you have lived in Ireland for 3 out of the 4 years before your child was born. You should send:

To prove your residency, you can send:

  • Tax records, including P60, P45 and P35L certificates
  • Records of any social welfare benefits or a statement from the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection confirming that the parent received benefits and giving exact dates
  • Other documents to fill any gaps in periods of residency, such as, pay slips, utility bills, an official rent/lease agreement, a rent book or bank statements showing local transactions

The documents must be originals. Copies are not accepted.

I am a citizen of a country outside the EEA/Switzerland and my child was born in Ireland.

You will have to show that you (or the child's other parent) have lived legally in Ireland for 3 out of the 4 years before your child was born. Time spent waiting for an International Protection decision or living in Ireland on a student visa do not count towards the residence requirements. You should send:

  • Your original passport with permission stamps to reside in Ireland and/or your Irish Residence Permit Card (IRP)
  • Letters from the Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (INIS) granting you permission to remain in the State. Not every residence permission is granted by letter, so this will depend on the type of residency you have in Ireland.
  • A written summary statement. The summary should by signed, and include:
  1. Your passport number
  2. Name of passport holder
  3. Description of the stamp(s) (for example, Stamp 4)
  4. Dates of the permission

I have refugee status and my child was born in Ireland.

  • Your original travel document
  • The letter from the Department of Justice and Equality confirming that you have been granted refugee status
  • Your Irish Residence Permit Card

I have indefinite leave to remain in the UK and lived in Northern Ireland for at least three years before the birth of my child

You must apply for a certificate of nationality from the Immigration Service Delivery. To apply, complete Declaration Form C (pdf) (or (Declaration Form D if you are acting in loco parentis)

I am an Irish citizen by birth and my child was born abroad.

  • Your child is an Irish citizen by birth because you (or the child’s other parent) was born on the island of Ireland. The child is Irish regardless of where they were born. You should send:
  • Your child's full birth certificate,
  • Your full birth certificate
  • Your marriage certificate (if applicable)

I am an Irish citizen, but I was not born in Ireland. My child was born abroad.

You must register the child’s birth on the Foreign Births Register before you can apply for an Irish passport for your child. Once this has been completed you should send:

  • The child's certificate of entry in the Foreign Births Register, which was issued by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
  • The child's birth certificate

I am an Irish citizen by naturalisation, and my child was born abroad

You must register the child’s birth on the Foreign Births Register before you can apply for an Irish passport for your child. Once this has been completed you should send:

  • The child's certificate of entry in the Foreign Births Register, which was issued by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
  • The child's birth certificate.

If you are an Irish citizen and your child was born abroad and adopted under Irish law, the certificate of entry in the Irish Adoption Authority's Register of Intercountry Adoptions as well as your passport or birth certificate is required. (If you are living abroad and adopted your child abroad, you should apply for the adoption to be entered in the Register of Intercountry Adoptions.)

I am an Irish citizen and I adopted my child abroad

You should include:

Useful contacts

You can order birth, marriage, civil partnership and adoption certificates online from the HSE.

You can order a certificate of entry in the Register of Intercountry Adoptions from the Adoption Authority.

Information on how to obtain a foreign birth registration certificate is available on the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade website.

Treoir provides information on passports for children of unmarried parents on its website.

You can contact the Passport Service by phone or webchat.

Passport Office

Knockmaun House
42-47 Lower Mount Street
Dublin 2
D02 TN83
Ireland

Opening Hours: 9:00am -4:30pm, Mon-Fri
Tel: +353 (0)1 671 1633

Passport Office

1a South Mall
Cork
Ireland

Citizenship Division

Department of Justice Office

Rosanna Road
Tipperary Town
Tipperary
E34 N566
Ireland

Opening Hours: Helpline: 10:00 am -12:30 pm, Tuesdays and Thursdays only
Tel: +353 62 32500
Locall: 1890 252 854

Garda National Immigration Bureau

13/14 Burgh Quay
Dublin 2
Ireland
D02 XK70

Page edited: 21 August 2020