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Notice to quit and eviction in Ireland

Information

Local authority tenants

Legally, a local authority in Ireland can evict you without any reason as long as the correct procedure is followed. This means first issuing a "notice to quit" and then applying to court for an order. However, in practice, local authorities in Ireland do not evict their tenants without reason and if you pay your rent and comply with other conditions of the tenancy, you will normally be able to stay in your home for as long as you want.

Housing association tenants

Although the legislation is different, housing associations in Ireland, like local authorities, can evict you without any reason as long as they follow the correct procedure. This means first issuing a "notice to quit" and then applying to court for an order. However, in practice, housing associations do not evict their tenants without reason and if you pay your rent and comply with other conditions of the tenancy, you will normally be able to stay in your home for as long as you want.

If you are in temporary accommodation provided by a housing association, your position is much weaker and legally the housing association does not even need to issue a "notice to quit". Again, however, in practice, housing associations do not evict their tenants without reason.

Where to apply

Further information about your rights, and notice to quit and eviction, is available from the Housing Department of your local authority or from your housing association.

Threshold is a charitable organisation that provides advice, information and support to everyone on housing rights in Ireland. The organisation has three national offices (Dublin, Galway and Cork). Contact them for free, confidential advice and information at:

Threshold

21 Stoneybatter
Dublin 7
Ireland

Opening Hours:Mon-Fri 9.30 am - 5 pm
Tel:1890 334 334
Fax:(01) 677 2407
Homepage: http://www.threshold.ie
Email: advice@threshold.ie


Page updated: 13 August 2010

Language

Gaeilge

Related Documents

  • If your landlord wants you to leave
    The rules that a private landlord must comply with when ending a residential tenancy.
  • Resolving disputes between landlords and tenants
    Disputes can arise between landlords and tenants in rented accommodation. In many cases, these disputes can be resolved informally between the two parties. Find out more.
  • Types of tenancy in Ireland
    Periodic and fixed-term tenancies are the most common type of tenancy in Ireland. Tenants have security of tenure for 3 ½ years after an initial six-month period. This is called a Part 4 tenancy.

Contact Us

If you have a question relating to this topic you can contact the Citizens Information Phone Service on 0761 07 4000 (Monday to Friday, 9am to 8pm) or you can visit your local Citizens Information Centre.