Travelling to Ireland during COVID-19

Introduction

Since 6 March 2022, all COVID-19 travel restrictions are removed. You no longer need to complete a passenger locator form. You also no longer need proof of vaccination or recovery, or a COVID-19 test.

You should follow public health advice if you develop symptoms of COVID-19.

Passenger locator form

Since 6 March 2022, all COVID-19 travel restrictions are removed. You no longer need to complete a passenger locator form. You also no longer need proof of vaccination or recovery, or a COVID-19 test.

If you plan to travel on to Northern Ireland, you should check current guidance.

Do I need a COVID test before coming to Ireland?

Since 6 March 2022, all COVID-19 travel restrictions are removed. You no longer need to complete a passenger locator form. You also no longer need proof of vaccination or recovery, or a COVID-19 test.

Do I need to quarantine?

You do not have to quarantine when you arrive in Ireland.

You should follow public health advice if you develop symptoms of COVID-19.

Travelling with children

Since 6 March 2022, all COVID-19 travel restrictions are removed. You no longer need to complete a passenger locator form. You also no longer need proof of vaccination or recovery, or a COVID-19 test.

What does fully vaccinated mean?

Since 6 March 2022, all COVID-19 travel restrictions are removed. You no longer need to complete a passenger locator form. You also no longer need proof of vaccination or recovery, or a COVID-19 test.

A standard acceptance period of 14 days after the final dose in a primary vaccine series of a vaccine is required for all vaccines accepted for travel to Ireland.

You are fully vaccinated when it is:

  • 14 days after the second AstraZeneca dose or second Covishield dose
  • 14 days after the second Pfizer-BioNtech dose
  • 14 days after the second Moderna dose
  • 14 days after the single Janssen dose
  • 14 days after the second Sinopharm dose (also called Vero Cell Inactivated)
  • 14 days after your second dose of Coronavac (Sinovac)
  • 14 days after your second dose of Covaxin
  • 14 days after your second dose of of Novavax (Nuvaxovid)

Mixed vaccines

If you got different vaccines for your first and second doses, you are fully vaccinated once 14 days has passed based on your second vaccine.

If you got a vaccine other than those listed above, you are not considered ‘fully vaccinated’.

You are also not fully vaccinated if the time between your first and second doses is less than the required period (for two dose vaccines).

Single dose and recovered from COVID-19

You are considered fully vaccinated if you got a single dose of any of the above vaccines within 180 days of a positive RT-PCR test result. You must show proof of the positive test and the vaccine dose. Since 1 February 2022 you are considered fully vaccinated after 14 days.

What is valid proof of vaccination?

If you were vaccinated in the EEA you would have received an EU Digital COVID Certificate (DCC).

Since 1 July 2023, you will no longer get an EU Digital Covid Certificate for a negative test (PCR and antigen) or as proof of recovery (recovery certificates).

The EU regulation that required member states to issue EU Digital COVID-19 Certificates (DCC) expired on 30 June 2023.

If you were vaccinated in a country outside the EEA you could have had a valid COVID-19 vaccination certificate that has been officially recognised as equivalent to the EU DCC.

What does ‘recovered from COVID-19’ mean?

Since 6 March 2022, all COVID-19 travel restrictions are removed. You no longer need to complete a passenger locator form. You also no longer need proof of vaccination, or recovery or a COVID-19 test.

You are ‘recovered from COVID-19’ if you had COVID-19 in the past 180 days (and no less than 11 days before you arrive in Ireland).

Page edited: 20 February 2024